History of PurplePublished on May 10, 2021

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  • NYMPH CHANDELIER BY KOKET, COVET HOUSE

  • AUSTRALIAN COTTON HAND TOWEL, DISTINCTLY HOME, $20, HUDSON’S BAY

  • VALSPAR “TWILIGHT PURPLE”

  • COZY TALL CHAIR, TOM TAILOR

  • SLIM RUNWAY LILAC ALUMINUM WATCH, $260, MICHAEL KORS

  • Ă–RFJĂ„LL PURPLE SWIVEL CHAIR, $49.99, IKEA

There is no colour more regal than purple. The deep, rich shade is well established in the history of design and style with a long-standing association with royalty and Roman emperors. It eased its way to becoming one of the most common colours associated with Victorian style, and no 1980s home was complete without a little lavender thrown in. Today, designers opt for a soft tone to create elegant spaces with modern influences.

One of the greatest benefits of decorating with purple is that its many shades work as one. You can easily combine a deep plum tone with a soft lavender to set a monochromatic scheme while also creating a colour-filled room.

Another benefit of the versatile shade is that it mixes well with others. Colour enthusiasts often look to nature for inspiration, which is where you’ll find purple mixing with green in one the most eye-catching combinations of colour balancing. Soft green and lilac or deep purple and emerald green pair beautifully together.

Not only will you find it on the décor scene, but purple has become an ideal choice for accessories with its ability to blend with both silver and gold as well as being a popular addition to most patterned fabrics.


Mary Taggart

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